Online Video Distribution

The challenge is how does one begin to see the sub-culture, de-centralized communities and parts clearly? Lets face it, between my cable TV box, internet connection, mobile phone, radio antenna and over-the-television OTT boxes like Apple TV or Roku… the world can seem like an overwhelming place.

Unlockbiz2Re-Connecting With Your Audience Through OTT Platforms

The Over the Top (OTT) online video world (Chromecast, Roku, AppleTV etc etc) may seem scary, insanely saturated and just plain too much. It does not have to be this way!

As recent business publications and production company websites suggest, there are between 18 and 51 uses for video inside and outside organizations. Whether its highlighting senior managers for an investor relations road-show, showcasing tourist destinations in Maui, demonstrating new medical procedures or training new hires on the organizational culture.

The broader more robust picture, depending on generational views and allowable imagination, is there may be more like 501 uses for video and over 1, 500 distribution outlets. This statement may seem overwhelming to some, so lets break it down using another viewpoint.

The New York City tri-state area to some might seem like a big, scary, rude and hectic place. After being a here a bit, one begins to realize the planet of Manhattan is really a series of small villages strung together with each having their own subculture.

Conversely, Australia might seem like a huge open place, because sure, it is a sizable continent. However, once you break it down into its regions and parts; – one begins to see it as a collection of cultures, weather patterns and distinct thought processes with their own focus. Each section and area having its own flavor. The continent of Australia also looks smaller when you begin to wrap the brain around the fact that its entire population of people could fit into the New York Tri State area.

Density of people can be confusing to the naked eye and so can a lot of open space. It depends on the experience and references one brings to the table in each case. It also depends on what your searching for as an end-result.

The same applies to online content development and video distribution over the web, as well as the social media pile-ups and the country of Facebook. The challenge then is how does one begin to see the sub-culture, de-centralized communities and parts clearly? Lets face it, between my cable TV box, internet connection, mobile phone, radio antenna and over-the-television OTT boxes like Apple TV or Roku… the world can seem like an overwhelming place.

How how does one figure what is relevant to audiences with so many options both from a business to business (B2B) and business to consumer (B2C) viewpoint?

Keep in mind that these relationships are two way streets too. Consumers make or break brands every day along with top-down management decisions about how to interact in the marketplace. In short, we are all in the same boat (ok its a big ocean-line) , but views appear different from bow to stern because we can’t always see each other.

On this post about how to curate and sort through options while blending perspectives, I happen to think Jennifer Grogono from Ustudio explained it best in a video interview.

• 1) Its important to not get overwhelmed because there are tools and solutions to help with the science behind the art of utilizing video.
• 2) Companies also need to have honest collaborative dialogues (across departments) with small teams to devise clear strategies based on relevance for key viewers.
• 3) Certain organizations need to redefine and streamline roles. It is not unlike what happened with many IT people who became the CIO (Chief Information Officer). Today, its now important to have a Chief Content and Distribution Officer { CCDO } who can continue to fortify bonds with customers – an experienced advocate working with core competency people in a more integrated way.

Jen is right and well spoken on all three counts.

See the clip below to hear it in her own words.

Jen is a frequent speaker on industry panels related to the intersection of media, marketing and technology. Her early work in digital media has been recognized through industry awards and features in business publications like the New York Times, Fortune, and Wall Street Journal.

Its also this intersection of media that prompted me to start DKPMG back in 2005. Why? Solutions are needed because large and small companies do not always have it in their lexicon to cope with rapidly changing variables being thrown at them. I saw it coming in the late 80s when working on the Olympics for NBC, Dick Clark, USA Network, and again in the mid 90s looking closely at Theme Parks and Interactive Media usage compared to theater going film audiences.

Today, the collision of media, marketing and technology has finally arrived. I happen to think there are few other colliding factors too, but I will get to them in Part 2 of this 3 part series. Part three of the series will be about considerations and answers to frequently asked questions that arose, on this subject, over the last 7 years.

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